Blade Runner: The Director's Cut

Blade Runner: The Director's Cut
Blade Runner: The Director's Cut
  • R
  • 1h 57m
  • 1982
Common Sense Media Iconage 16+
Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) prowls the steel-and-microchip jungle of 21st Century Los Angeles. He's a "blade runner" stalking genetically made criminal replicants. His assignment: kill them. Their crime: wanting to be human. The story of Blade Runner is familiar to countless fans. But few have seen it like this. Because this is director Ridley Scott's own vision of his sci-fi classic. This new version omits Deckard's voice narration, develops in slightly greater detail the romance between Deckard and Rachael (Sean Young) and removes the "uplifting" finale. The result is a heightened emotional impact: a great film made greater. Most intriguing of all is a newly included unicorn vision that suggests that Deckard may be a humanoid. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Is Deckard a replicant? As with all things in the future, you must discover the answer yourself.

Common Sense Media

Common Sense Media Iconage 16+
Common Sense Says
A dark, philosophical sci-fi drama for older teens.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Blade Runner envisions a bleak 2019 Los Angeles that's dark, oppressive, polluted, steeped in fear, and features genetically engineered organic robots called replicants that look just like humans. It's a very violent film, with multiple fights and killings, some gruesome and disturbing. Characters are killed by gunfire at close range and in brutal hand-to-hand combat. Characters dangle over the side of skyscrapers; multiple fingers are broken graphically; people are gagged and choked; a man's eyes are poked out (how much is seen depends upon the version of the film). There are repeated close shots of bloodied corpses and dying characters. While there's no overt sex, it's implied, and there's some partial nudity (breasts), passionate kissing, and several scenes that border on rough or nonconsensual sex. Smoking is pervasive; multiple scenes show characters drinking, and the hero often turns to alcohol when he's under stress. Editor's note: Families should avoid the earliest version (1982) of the movie; instead, go with Ridley Scott's 1992 "Director's Cut" or 2007's "Final Cut," a remastered version by Scott with few changes from the 1992 release.

A Lot or A Little?

The parents’ guide to what’s in this movie.
Positive Messages
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Positive Role Models
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Violence
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Sex
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Language
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Consumerism
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Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
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Additional Info

  • Genre:Sci-Fi, Thriller, Action
  • Release Date:June 25, 1982
  • Languages:English
  • Captions:English
  • Audio Format:
    5.1
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