Chariots of Fire | Full Movie

Chariots of Fire
  • PG
  • 2h 3m
  • 1981
Certified Fresh84%
Common Sense Media Iconage 11+
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In this Academy Award winner for Best Picture, two very different men on the same team vie to win Olympic gold to demonstrate to the world the worth of their deeply held--and strongly opposing--convictions. Yet a friendship builds between the two in this true story that is as strong as their desire to win in Chariots of Fire. Paris Olympics, 1924. Scotsman Eric Liddell (Ian Charleson--Gandhi) competes to prove the superiority of this Christian faith, while his teammate, Harold Abrahams (Ben Cross--Exorcist: The Beginning), a Jewish Englishman, is driven to win to show the world that Jews are not inferior people. But as different as they two competitors are, the bond that develops between them reveals to both how complex their true motives are . . . and how much they really have in common.

Rotten Tomatoes® Score

TOMATOMETER®
Certified Fresh84%
Critics Consensus: Decidedly slower and less limber than the Olympic runners at the center of its story, the film nevertheless manages to make effectively stirring use of its spiritual and patriotic themes.
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Common Sense Media

Common Sense Media Iconage 11+
Common Sense Says
Brilliant true story of 1924 Olympic footrace.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Chariots of Fire is a 1981 movie that tells the true story of British Olympic runners. It has very little mature content -- drinking and smoking mostly -- but may be too hard to follow for younger fans of sports movies. The two runners it features are worth discussing with kids, though. One runner is Jewish and fights prejudice through competition. The other is a Scottish missionary and refuses to run an Olympic race on Sunday, even when the Prince of Wales tries to appeal to his love of country. As a side note, a lone Lipton Tea billboard shows up along a racetrack -- a great reminder of just how littered with advertising most sporting events are today.

A Lot or A Little?

The parents’ guide to what’s in this movie.
Positive Messages
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Positive Role Models
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Violence
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Sex
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Language
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Consumerism
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Additional Info

  • Genre:Biopic, Drama, Sports, Classics
  • Release Date:September 25, 1981
  • Highest Available for Purchase:HD

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