Big Daddy

Big Daddy
Big Daddy
  • PG-13
  • 1h 33m
  • 1999
Rotten40%
Common Sense Media Iconage 14+
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Thirty-two-year-old Sonny Koufax (Adam Sandler) has spent his whole life avoiding responsibility. But when his girlfriend dumps him for an older man, he's got to find a way to prove he's ready to grow up. In a desperate last-ditch effort, Sonny adopts five-year-old Julian (Cole Sprouse, Dylan Sprouse) to impress her. She's not impressed... and he can't return the kid. Uh-oh for Sonny!

Rotten Tomatoes® Score

TOMATOMETER®
Rotten40%
Critics Consensus: Adam Sandler acquits himself admirably, but his charm isn't enough to make up for Big Daddy's jarring shifts between crude humor and mawkish sentimentality.
Reviews
Time Out
Fresh

This lightweight, bubblegum caper synthesises robust, physical humour, self-deprecation and witty...

June 21, 2017
Houston Chronicle
Jeff Millar
Fresh

Funny-sweet, understand, not bleccchh sweet.

June 21, 2017
More on Rotten Tomatoes

Common Sense Media

Common Sense Media Iconage 14+
Common Sense Says
Typical Adam Sandler: charm mixed with crude humor.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Big Daddy is a 1999 Adam Sandler film in which Sandler plays an irresponsible man-child who "adopts" a young boy under false pretenses. There is frequent profanity; humor is mined from a 5-year-old saying things like, "Is that the guy with the old balls?" and "But I wipe my own ass." Adults use variations on "s--t," "d--k," "hell," "a--hole," and "damn." While the humor is on the whole typical goofy and obnoxious Sandler fare, jokes are made at the expense of overweight people, and the very idea of two men falling in love and showing their affection by flirting and kissing is seen as something awkward. There is an incredible amount of product placement, and characters repeatedly mentioning McDonald's, Hooters, Pepperidge Farm, Pepsi, and assorted Frito-Lay products. For comedic effect, a homeless man makes reference to taking too many mushrooms in the 1970s. Expect beer and alcohol drinking. A father reminds his son of the time he found a bag of marijuana in his desk. Overall, for those who enjoy Adam Sandler movies, this is typical of the formula he used to great success in the 1990s, and by this point, you either like it or you don't.

A Lot or A Little?

The parents’ guide to what’s in this movie.
Positive Messages
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Positive Role Models
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Violence
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Sex
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Language
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Additional Info

  • Genre:Comedy
  • Release Date:June 25, 1999
  • Languages:English, Spanish
  • Captions:English, Spanish
  • Audio Format:
    5.1
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