Jojo Rabbit

Jojo Rabbit
Jojo Rabbit
  • PG-13
  • 1h 49m
  • 2019
Certified Fresh79%
Common Sense Media Iconage 13+
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Writer director Taika Waititi, brings his signature style of humor and pathos to his latest film, JOJO RABBIT, a World War II satire that follows a lonely German boy whose world view is turned upside down when he discovers his single mother is hiding a young girl in their attic. Aided only by his idiotic imaginary friend, Adolf Hitler, Jojo must confront his naive patriotism.
© 2019 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All rights reserved.

Rotten Tomatoes® Score

TOMATOMETER®
Certified Fresh79%
Critics Consensus: Jojo Rabbit's blend of irreverent humor and serious ideas definitely won't be to everyone's taste -- but either way, this anti-hate satire is audacious to a fault.
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Common Sense Media

Common Sense Media Iconage 13+
Common Sense Says
Uneven but amusing WWII satire has violence, hate speech.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Jojo Rabbit is a satiric comedy from director Taika Waititi about a young boy in Nazi Germany who discovers that his beloved mother is hiding a teenaged Jewish girl. Though many parts of the movie are light and funny, others are deadly serious, with mature subject matter and violence that's disturbing, even if it's not especially gory. There are maimed soldiers, dead bodies, children carrying (and using) machine guns, and the hanging bodies of people executed by Nazis. One sympathetic character is killed suddenly and tragically, altering the tone of the movie. Children are orphaned and in frequent danger. An animal is killed on-screen (a boy twists a rabbit's neck around, then throws the limp body into the woods). Cursing isn't frequent but includes "s--t," "hell," "damn," and one "f--k off." There's also lots of upsetting hate speech about Jewish people and other enemies of the Nazi regime, but the movie's sympathies are clearly with the downtrodden. A boy's imaginary friend is Adolf Hitler, who's depicted as largely supportive and kind, if also a hateful fascist. Characters drink and get variously sloppy or elated, and many smoke cigarettes. The movie offers a nuanced take on a subject that's very difficult to mine humor from: Some people may be offended by its very concept, but it's more thoughtful and funnier than families might expect. Still, it's one that you'll want to talk about afterward.

A Lot or A Little?

The parents’ guide to what’s in this movie.
Positive Messages
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Positive Role Models
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Violence
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Sex
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Language
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Drinking, Drugs & Smoking
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Additional Info

  • Genre:Drama, Comedy
  • Release Date:October 18, 2019
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